borzoi puppy by WildHorse馬烈


10bullets:

The Brother by SAMLIM

ragemoreroberts:

gailsimone:

sisterofthewolves:

Wolf and elk in the Chernobyl exclusion zone. Pictures by Sergey Gaschak.

THE RADIOACTIVE FALLOUT ZONE HAS TURNED INTO A REFUGE

After 300,000 people had to abondon Chernobyl after the catastrophic nuclear accident in 1986, wildlife have been thriving in the area - including large packs of wolves. Fields, villages and towns are replaced with forests and wetlands, and the fallout zone is now the largest wildlife sanctaury in Europe. 

Despite the radioactivity in the area, animals seem to be as good as unafected, and the wildlife of Chernobyl is considered healthy. Journalist Mary Mycio writes:

According to all the population counts performed by Ukraine and Belarus over the past 27 years, there is enormous animal diversity and abundance. The prevailing scientific view of the exclusion zone has become that it is an unintentional wildlife sanctuary. This conclusion rests on the premise that radiation is less harmful to wildlife populations than we are.”

Read the rest of Mary Mycio’s story about Chernobyl’s wildlife

Watch the rest of Sergey Gaschak’s gallery of Chernobyl’s wildlife

Wow…relevant!

When I went to Chernobyl, I had never seen so much wildlife. They have hundreds of wild cats and dogs because everyone had to abandon their animals when they left. Its such a beautiful place. 


lizardking90:

Cougars vs Coyotes
-livescience

lizardking90:

Cougars vs Coyotes

-livescience


thatfunnyblog:

 

awwww-cute:

I bet you’ve never seen a Baby Tree Kangaroo

awwww-cute:

I bet you’ve never seen a Baby Tree Kangaroo



marine-science:

marine-science:

Great white shark and cage divers  by PicHunting on Flickr.
WOW. That is all I can say.

libutron:

An exceptional macro of a Leafcutter Bee (Megachilidae) from East Greenbush, NY, US.
Photo credit: ©main1

libutron:

An exceptional macro of a Leafcutter Bee (Megachilidae) from East Greenbush, NY, US.

Photo credit: ©main1